Collapsing Pes Plano Valgus

Collapsing pes plano valgus results in too much dropping of the height of the midfoot with a disproportionate drop in the height on the inside of the foot.

Collapsing Pes Planovalgus

What is Collapsing Pes Planovalgus?

In this type of flat feet the arches are dropping quite severely, and the problem is progressive.

Untreated this foot will become totally flat and often stiff and prone to arthritis. Ironically it is often more painful during the collapse rather than at the end stage totally flat foot. However, the totally flat foot that results is often quite difficult to walk on and tiring.

The reason for this is best explained by reading the Wheelbarrow foot article. People with collapsing pes plano valgus tend to walk with their feet stuck out at an angle greater than 10°.

Collapsing flat feet in older people

Have I got Collapsing Pes Planovalgus?

Collapsing pes plano valgus results in too much dropping of the height of the midfoot with a disproportionate drop in the height on the inside of the foot. This tends to cause the foot to tip inwards as well as flatten. The outside edge of the forefoot often twists outwards and bunions (hallux abducto-valgus) are very common as part of the condition. Pain often occurs under the arch, top of the foot, inside of the ankle and just in front of the outside of the ankle.
The most common condition that is linked to this condition is degeneration and partial or full rupture of a tendon that runs to the inside and just behind your ankle known as Tibial Posterior. This Tibialis Posterior Dysfunction is often cited as the cause of the collapsing foot profile, but it is still not clear whether it is the cause or an effect of the collapsing pes plano valgus, and it might vary in individuals.

How do I treat this foot condition?

This foot problem needs professional advice.

It can be treated conservatively, but even then such treatment the condition will severely restrict your footwear choice. Anti-pronating running shoes are very helpful to walk in, especially with custom supportive foot orthoses (insoles) and occasionally ankle braces. These need to be fitted professionally.

However, sometimes the only way forward is surgery, which although usually very effective is quite complex and takes a good six months to recover from.

View our Orthotics for Fallen Arches

Each of our orthoses has been developed with specific medical conditions in mind. We offer primary products per condition, though several others have been found to help patients given the biomechanical engineering behind them.

 
X Line TPD orthotic X Line 70 - High Density orthotic X Line RIF orthotic Vectorthotic customisable orthotic
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